The Bloody Bar Keeps Moving!

For eight weeks leading to last Sunday, I took part in Whoop’s Project PR which was a recovery-based structured run training program for the 5000m distance. Whoop is a wrist-based sensor with a big-data backend that automatically tracks your body’s unique physiological state to determine your personal readiness to perform each day.

There are four key metrics that make up the Recovery Percentage: Heart Rate Variability (HRV), Resting Heart Rate (RHR), Respiratory Rate, and Hours of Sleep. So each day I am given a recovery score, 0-33% Red, 34-66% Yellow and 67-100% Green. The program gave slightly different volume and intensity workouts depending on the result.

A year ago I had never run under 19 minutes for the distance. This summer I had only managed 18:32 but I had an ambitious sub-18 goal in mind and two pacers I’d instructed to hold me to it. The attempt was scheduled for Sunday the 6th of December incidentally the same day that Kenya’s Kibiwott Kandie would attempt to set a new world record for the half marathon in Valencia.

We both had perfect 7-degree running conditions and we both smashed our records, him in 57:32 and me in 17:33.

Rediscover Your Mission

My time pales in comparison to Kandie but I was actually the fastest 50-59 age grouper by a good margin and 25th overall from the 2500+ Whoopers that recorded a result on race day.

Yet only a few days later I was less impressed with myself. This is something I believe psychologists call “arrival fallacy” where you easily adjust to this new state of being so much so that actually achieving a goal turns out to be less satisfying than expected.

That’s just stupid, the joy of those good days should be savored so I have intentionally dedicated a little thought-time to re-orient back to the mission. The pursuit of a better me, valuing the process over the end result.

Value The Process Over The End Result

I am happy that the process worked and I am very proud of the result, but it isn’t the result that brings me the most satisfaction. The camaraderie I get from my training groups and buddies of all abilities is all the joy and motivation I need.

I was humbled that friends and family turned up to cheer. That my pacers Johan and Thomas were willing to give up their time was a major motivation, and I was driven by a need to honor that commitment. With four laps to go, I had to get the shovel out and dig really deep to stick with them.

A week later I remind myself to enjoy the achievement but recommit to the process and focus on the question of what I can do daily that moves me forward – simple things that are to be done well every day.

Recognize That Success is Fluid

Success is fluid. There will always be faster (and slower) athletes, the pursuit of being the best you can be is multi-faceted and is a very individual journey of growth. Define success on your own terms and embrace the many opportunities you encounter along the way.

I suggest that rather than having only fixed end-goals it is important to view training as a succession of practices that build an imperfect yet wonderful big picture. In these chaotic months of the pandemic, this has never been more true. Greatness and that is YOUR greatness comes from years of grit, effort, and many stumbles along the way – so I encourage you to enjoy every second of it!

Hope to see you along the way. 

Tom J

Stockholm December 2020.

One thought on “The Bloody Bar Keeps Moving!

  1. Proud of you Tommy. You were a nice little boy, even before you had all these goals and all that beard. Well done XSeth (proud father)

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